As many of you know, over the last 12 months I’ve been busy beavering away on a book to capture my thought leadership around communication to complement the workplace training, coaching, speaking and facilitation I run.

The result, ‘Soft is the New Hard: How to Communicate Effectively Under Pressure’, is set for release on 28 March 2019.

The book blurb and testimonials below will give you a great overview of what you can expect.

Book Blurb

Leaders! Do you have days when you feel like you’re communicating with toddlers rather than adults in the workplace?

Are you tired of dealing with sulking, tantrums, personality clashes and poor performance?

If you are not getting the results you need as a high-performance leader, this book is for you.

In it, you will learn a new approach to communication that will radically improve your leadership effectiveness.

Communication is the KING of the so-called “soft” skills that are essential in the modern workplace. Yet most of us have had little or no training in how to communicate effectively, particularly under pressure.

We haven’t been taught the FOUNDATIONS of GREAT communication.

In Soft is the New Hard: How to Communicate Effectively Under Pressure, communications and soft-skills specialist, Leah Mether, gives you the complete solution: a step-by-step process that underpins communication and lays the foundations for success.

Mether’s proven strategies will help you:

– defuse conflict

– manage yourself under pressure

– inspire individuals and teams to action

– influence decisions and outcomes

– lead your team through change, restructure or transition

– deliver difficult messages

– communicate clearly in an emergency or crisis

No-one is a perfect communicator, everyone can improve. And with this book, Mether shows you how.

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Testimonials

Finishing Soft is the New Hard is one of my proudest achievements. The icing on the cake is that readers are enjoying it.

Here’s what some of my early readers have had to say:

“This book is a masterclass in communication. Packed with case studies, stories and research it has a perfect blend of anecdote and data. Soft is indeed the new hard, and sometimes it’s real hard. But as Leah has shown with succinct and elegantly simple concepts, it’s a skill that can be learned. Full of many eye-opening, “wow!”, moments and many, more reassuring “phew, it’s not just me” moments, this isn’t just a book for leaders, it’s a book for life.”

Rachael Robertson, Antarctic Expedition Leader, Leadership Expert and Author of Leading on the Edge: Extraordinary Stories and Leadership Insights from the World’s Most Extreme Workplace

“If you are a leader who wants to be heard in the 21st century, this book decodes the future of communications.”

Oscar Trimboli – Author & Award Winning Podcaster of Deep Listening 

“I wish I’d had this book as a reference when I started my leadership career. I’m glad it’s been written now. This will be a go-to book in my organisational leadership and coaching practice. I’ll be buying it for many of my clients. There are so many concepts in here that I value, it’s hard to choose one. Yet this, for me, sums up the book “Respect is everything as a leader. And to get it, you need to communicate in a way that connects.” If you want to ensure you’re on top of your communication game, you simply must read this book.

Maree McPherson, Leadership and Executive Coach, Professional Mentor, and Author of Cutting Through the Grass Ceiling: Women Creating Possibility in Regional Australia

“Soft is the New Hard’ is a personal coaching session on how to improve your own communication in order to improve your success and satisfaction in your workplace. A must read for all leaders and aspiring leaders.”

Sally Neenan, Team Leader

“I sincerely love this book. I feel like I knew soft skills were important but now I really understand the impact they have in so many different environments. I am confidently walking away with an action plan (the five C’s) that I can easily reference as needed. I will happily read this multiple times.”

Robyn Wildblood, Program Support Manager